Two out of three adults in the US have not completed an Advance Directive.

Source: Health Affairs. A recent university research team found that only 38.2 percent of people with a chronic illness had advanced directives compared to 32.7 percent of healthy people. 

Put your wishes down on paper and share them. Planning in advance is a tremendous gift for you and your loved ones. A Death Midwife will help inform you of the many choices and possibilities at the end of life and help you create a Living Death Plan. Ideally, you will review your plan on an annual basis to ensure your wishes are still current and keep them in a safe place known to your loved ones. 

“Death is but a mirror of a life well lived on iridescent wings.”

“Death is but a mirror of a life well lived on iridescent wings.”

Crossing Threshold can assist you with compiling your Death Plan which include important and sensitive documents such as: 

  • Arizona Health Care Directive - In the event you were not able to speak/act for yourself, this document gives specific medical care directives at the end of life.

  • Prehospital Medical Care Directive - which is commonly referred to as the Do Not Resuscitate or “DNR” form.

  • Health Care Power of Attorney - allows you to appoint a person you trust as your healthcare agent, who is authorized to make medical decisions on your behalf.

  • Financial Power of Attorney - allows you to appoint a person you trust as your agent, who is authorized to make financial/business decisions on your behalf.

  • Funeral and Body Disposition Plan - outlines your wishes concerning the care of your body after death and your request for final disposition (such as burial, cremation, etc.).

Death is an integral part of life, as natural and predictable as being born. But whereas birth is cause for celebration, death has become dreaded and unspeakable issue to be avoided by every means possible in our modern society. Perhaps it is that death reminds us of our human vulnerability in spite of all our technical advances. We may be able to delay it, but we cannot escape it.
— Elisabeth Kubler Ross